Tommy
Tommy Dempsey was actually born in Glasgow, but he emigrated with his Irish parents to Dublin at just 6 weeks old. He remembers his early musical beginnings with his granny, who used to love to sing even at 80 plus. A man, (a busker he thinks), came to see her and there were two Irish tinker ladies, one of whom used to play a harp. Music was an integral part of the Irish household in those days, but his interest was mainly in Irish dancing (most of his songs are set to dance tunes). He began to visit England when he was about fifteen, and settled in Birmingham in his early twenties. His career was born out of the early ’60s Folk Revival. A mate at work had heard Tommy singing songs that he had learnt as a boy and invited him along to a gathering at a pub called the Big Bull’s Head down one side of  Birmingham Civic Hall. The organiser was Ian Campbell, along with Dave Swarbrick and Dave Phillips, and together with a few others they formed a group called the Clarion Choir. From around 1965, Tommy teamed up with John Swift, “himself an outstanding but non- professional singer” and “an accompanist par excellence”. That partnership lasted some ten years. Later groups have included Drowsy Maggie, Slip Jig and for the last several years  his own band, Dempsey’s Lot.

© evansites 2017 

Irish Entertainment- Folk Music at it’s Very Best

Tommy

© evansites 2017 

Tommy Dempsey was actually born in Glasgow, but he emigrated with his Irish parents to Dublin at just 6 weeks old. He remembers his early musical beginnings with his granny, who used to love to sing even at 80 plus. A man, (a busker he thinks), came to see her and there were two Irish tinker ladies, one of whom used to play a harp. Music was an integral part of the Irish household in those days, but his interest was mainly in Irish dancing (most of his songs are set to dance tunes). He began to visit England when he was about fifteen, and settled in Birmingham in his early twenties. His career was born out of the early ’60s Folk Revival. A mate at work had heard Tommy singing songs that he had learnt as a boy and invited him along to a gathering at a pub called the Big Bull’s Head down one side of  Birmingham Civic Hall. The organiser was Ian Campbell, along with Dave Swarbrick and Dave Phillips, and together with a few others they formed a group called the Clarion Choir. From around 1965, Tommy teamed up with John Swift, “himself an outstanding but non-professional singer” and “an accompanist par excellence”. That partnership lasted some ten years. Later groups have included Drowsy Maggie, Slip Jig and for the last several years  his own band, Dempsey’s Lot.

Irish Entertainment-

Folk Music at it’s Very Best